• NOW SELLING WYFFELS!!

  • ProAg Solutions 2017 Soybean Plot Results

    2017 PROAG SOLUTIONS SOYBEAN PLOT RESULTS

  • New Addition to Buffalo Center

  • New Location Brings New Opportunity

    Now announcing ProAg Solutions newest location in Buffalo Center! We are very excited for this opportunity as a company as we are expanding our business. With the addition of the new location we are also adding two new employees to our team.

    Jay Mathahs:

    Jay has been involved in the agricultural industry for 25+ years. Jay has 25 years of experience in agriculture as a grain originator/location manager and also farms alongside his brother Jeff. Jay lives in Thompson with his wife Gwen and has two boys, Gunner & Kingston and a daughter Ashley.

    Kevin Propes:

    Kevin is joining ProAg Solutions with 23 years of agronomy experience in sales. Kevin received his Masters in Agronomy from the University of Illinois and has also obtained his CCA & CPAG. In his free time he also enjoys fishing.

  • There’s Still Time to Book Your Arial Application Acres

  • Soybean Pick the Yield Contest

    Stop by and check out our soybean test plot! Play to win up to $1000!
    Pick which three varieties and what you estimate they will yield this fall & be entered into a chance to win.

    See you soon!

  • Is This Bacterial Leaf Streak?

    Is This Bacterial Leaf Streak?

    July 10, 2017
    ICM News

    Bacterial leaf streak was confirmed for the first time in Iowa and other states in 2016. There is not a lot known about the disease but researchers at Colorado State University, Iowa State University, Kansas State University and University of Nebraska are collaborating to understand the disease and its impact on corn with partial funding through the Farm Bill.

    This past week we have received several photos of putative bacterial leaf streak symptoms and noticed a few tweets reporting the disease in Iowa and Nebraska.  Bacterial leaf streak is difficult to identify from a photo; it can look like many other diseases and abiotic disorders (Figures 1 and 2). An 8-page PDF on bacterial leaf streak that compares the symptoms of bacterial leaf streak with look-a-like diseases and disorders is available for download from the Crop Protection Network.

    The easiest and best way to confirm bacterial leaf streak is to send a sample to the ISU Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic. During the 2017 growing season, the first 100 samples received will be processed free-of-charge. We are interested in mapping where the disease is present and collecting samples of the pathogen for further research.

    Figure 1. This is NOT bacterial leaf streak, the “streaks” are too white.  This is probably wind damage.
    Figure 2. Bacterial leaf streak. Look for brown streaks that follow the veins. Look for a bright yellow halo when the diseased leaf is held up to the light.

     

    Links to this article are strongly encouraged, and this article may be republished without further permission if published as written and if credit is given to the author, Integrated Crop Management News, and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. If this article is to be used in any other manner, permission from the author is required. This article was originally published on July 10, 2017. The information contained within may not be the most current and accurate depending on when it is accessed.

  • Launch of Enlist Corn for 2018 Planting

     

    Dow AgroSciences is excited to announce the launch of Enlist™ corn for 2018 planting!  China’s Ministry of Agriculture approved the import of grain produced from corn containing the Enlist trait.

     

    With the Enlist system fully enabled in corn, a new, differentiated weed control option is now available to farmers. With the use of Enlist Duo® herbicide on Enlist corn, farmers will now have a better solution for effective and easy-to-use weed control that stays on-target.

     

    Farmers are demanding Enlist corn – those who have tried it have told us that the best-in-class packages of weed and insect control they get with SmartStax® Enlist and PowerCore® Enlist hybrids are important for their farms.  The Enlist corn launch follows the successful full system launch this year in cotton.

     

    More information will be coming soon on Enlist corn hybrids, available from Dow AgroSciences seed brands.

    Attached is the news release that was sent to agriculture trade media this morning.

    TRADE Enlist China Corn NR FINAL 061417

  • How Fast and Deep do Corn Roots Grow in Iowa?

    How Fast and Deep do Corn Roots Grow in Iowa?

    June 14, 2017

    Corn roots grow rapidly starting at the 4th-leaf stage and continue throughout vegetative development. This typically occurs from June to early July. Several factors affect root growth, but temperature and soil moisture are the most relevant factors in the absence of soil constraints. Well-developed, deep root systems are essential to support water and nutrient uptake and thus high yield potential. Hot and dry weather results in a depletion of moisture in the top 6-inch soil layer. This occurred in June of 2016 and also during the first two weeks of June 2017. Crop stress was evident in light soils or where root development was restricted. Should you be concerned about this? Maybe, maybe not. It is known that plant roots cannot grow in dry or saturated soil conditions. However, at this time it is unlikely that water is limiting root growth below a 6-inch soil depth.

    In 2016, the FACTS team collected root depth measurements at critical crop stages in six corn fields across Iowa. Measurements were taken on the row and at the center of two 30-inch rows. These fields had different treatments such as planting date and tile drainage. Results indicated that root depth increased over time consistently across sites and treatments. On average, corn roots grew about 2.75 inches per leaf stage to a maximum depth of 60 inches (Figure 1). Going into more specifics, corn roots initially increased at a slow rate (0.29 in./day) up to 5th-leaf and from then on with a rate of 1.22 in./day until silking stage when maximum depth is reached.

    Figure 1. Corn root growth progression from the 4th- to 20th-leaf stage at the in-row sampling location at six field locations across Iowa. Each point represents an average of three replications.

    Other important findings from this work are:

    1. Roots merge between the two 30-inch rows at approximately the 6th-leaf stage.
    2. Maximum rooting depth is largely determined by the depth of the groundwater table, root growth stops when it reaches a water table.

    These findings match closely with information in Corn Growth and Development where it is stated that corn roots grow at a rate of approximately one inch per day, meet in 30-inch row centers at approximately the 3rd-leaf stage, and reach maximum depths of six feet or greater near the blister to milk stage (Abendroth et al. 2011). Differences can occur due to geographic location, hybrid characteristics, and climate conditions. Additionally, accurately detecting rooting depth is difficult because root biomass is much less at deeper depths compared to those in the surface 6-inches.

     

    References

    Abendroth, L.J., R.W. Elmore, M.J. Boyer, and S.K. Marlay. 2011. Corn growth and development. PMR 1009, Iowa State University Extension, Ames, IA.

    Hammer, G.L., Z. Dong, G. McLean, A. Doherty, C. Messina, J. Schussler, C. Zinselmeier, S. Paszkiewiez, and M. Cooper. 2009. Can changes in canopy and/or root systems architecture explain historical maize yields trends in the US Corn Belt. Crop Science 49:229-312.

    Links to this article are strongly encouraged, and this article may be republished without further permission if published as written and if credit is given to the author, Integrated Crop Management News, and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. If this article is to be used in any other manner, permission from the author is required. This article was originally published on June 14, 2017. The information contained within may not be the most current and accurate depending on when it is accessed.

    http://crops.extension.iastate.edu/cropnews/2017/06/how-fast-and-deep-do-corn-roots-grow-iowa?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

  • Now Offering Crop Scouting Spring 2017